this post was submitted on 20 Jun 2024
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[–] [email protected] 4 points 4 weeks ago* (last edited 4 weeks ago) (8 children)

Right, by my point is that your accuracy and precision are the same whether you are making a 1 meter length object or a π meter length object. Your meter stick is not accurate to the width of a hydrogen atom, either.

But if we accept the precision of our manufacturing capabilities as "close enough," then it is equally as close to exactly π as it is to exactly 1.

In other words, to say we cannot make an object that is π meters is to say we cannot make an object that is any specific length.

[–] [email protected] 2 points 4 weeks ago (6 children)

The precision of our manufacturing capabilities might be limited as QM has this discreete nature. It might be limited in this universe. So pi may only exist theoretically

[–] [email protected] 2 points 4 weeks ago (5 children)

But you could make that same argument for a lot of fractions. 1/3 doesn't exist because you cannot divide a quantum in three. 0.333 repeating means that eventually you have to divide an indivisible foundational particle in thirds.

[–] [email protected] 3 points 4 weeks ago (1 children)

If you have three particles, 1/3 of that is one particle. No need to divide an indivisible particle.

[–] [email protected] 1 points 4 weeks ago (1 children)

But if I don't have three particles, 1/3 requires division.

[–] [email protected] 3 points 4 weeks ago

Right, but you can have exactly a third of some group of particles. You can't have exactly pi of some group of particles I think is what they were saying

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